Here's everything that's coming with us on our trip around the world. 

We've chosen items that are a good balance of lightweight, compact, durable, affordable, and (multi-)functional. We're packing simple and kinda-sorta light, but not obsessively so and not at the expense of minor comforts. Excluding food, water, we're each putting about 15 kilograms of stuff into our panniers and handlebar bags.


Bicycle: Salsa Marrakesh Flatbar Deore. With a sturdy steel (4130) frame, clearance for 50mm tires (sans fenders), a triple crankset (48/38/26t), disc brakes, down-tube shifters, a kickstand plate, and tons of braze-ons for bottle cages, the Marrakesh is built for world expeditions like ours. Jay's bike has had a bunch of modifications, including swapping the flatbar out for dropbars and moving the shifters to the downtube. [INITIAL GEAR REVIEW]

Tires50mm Schwalbe Marathon Mondials. The folding version. Not as puncture-proof as our old Marathon Pluses, but promise better grip for more technical terrain.

SaddleBrooks Cambium C17 Carved Saddle. Vegan-friendly, rain-friendly, and perineum-friendly. No break-in period and still super-comfortable after thousands of kilometers.

Panniers: Ortlieb Classic Back Rollers (2; 1,936g total). 20L capacity each. Bomb-proof and super-durable for the rough conditions of travel.

Front basket: KLICKfix Mini (900g) + Permanent Basket Holder (100g). A little heavier than a traditional handlebar bag, but way more versatile. Jay will be stashing a water-resistant drawstring bag (the REI Flash 22) in the basket, which can be quickly removed and comfortably worn in just a few seconds (the basket can also hold snacks, a sweater, or rocks to ward off wild dogs).

Rear rack: Tubus Logo (750g). Tubus racks are top-of-the-line for bike touring. The rack is rated to hold up to 40kg, and it's steel, so it can be repaired by a welder anywhere in the world.

Kickstand: Greenfield Kickstand (266g). Truthfully, I'd be going with my trusty Pletscher Double-Leg Center-Mount Kickstand (666g) if it fit with 50mm tires. But the one-legged Greenfield does the job, holding a (well-balanced) bike steady for short breaks. A kickstand, of course, is far from essential, but there are plenty of parts of the world without trees or buildings to lean a bike against, and picking a bike off the ground ten times per day can grow a little irksome.

PedalsMKS Sylvan Touring 9/16" Pedals + MKS Half Clip Mini Steel toe clips. Hefty and reliable.. The clips only stabilize the front of the foot, so it's easy to slide out safely during sudden stops. On more technical terrain, the clips can be easily removed altogether.

Front light: Cateye 300 (132g). USB-rechargeable, with high, low, and strobe functions. Bright enough for decent visibility during night riding, but not built for racing down dark mountain tracks at midnight.

Bottle cages: Blackburn Outpost Cargo Cage (2; 328g total) + Planet Bike Sideload Cage (40g) + Planet Bike Bottle Cage (60g) + Arundel Looney Bin Adjustable Cage (54g). The Outposts will hold a pair of two-liter bottles of water (on the fork). The Planet Bike cages will hold water and fuel on either side of the downtube, and the adjustable Looney Bin cage accommodates a 1L Nalgene on the seattube.

Bungee cords: Pantel Tactical 36" (22g) + Pro Grip 24" Adjustable (25g). Unobtrusive and simple, yet super-useful. The adjustable bungees are great for taking up slack on differently-sized loads.

Rear light: Knog Blinder (36g). USB-rechargeable and super-bright.

Bicycle lock: Kryptonite Kryptoflex 815 Combo Cable (322g). For low-security situations. More to stop an opportunist than a dedicated bicycle thief.

Helmet: Giro Revel (275g).

Cycling glovesGiro Bravo (52g). Jay toured Morocco without cycling gloves and ended up with a bad case of ulnar neuropathy. These gloves are light and well-padded and sure to help one's palms during many hours in the saddle (they also provide marginal warmth as fingerless gloves, or hand protection when hiking, scrambling, or climbing).

Leg straps: Redpoint Two-Sided Hook and Loop (22g). For keeping pant legs out of the drivetrain. Cut to length and easily adjustable.

Daypack: REI Flash 22 (365g). The pack sits in the handlebar basket while riding. Lightweight, with a few mesh bottle holders, some external pockets, and removable waist and chest straps.

Bicycle: Salsa Marrakesh Dropbar Deore

Tires50mm Schwalbe Marathon Mondials

SaddleBrooks Cambium C17 Carved Saddle

Panniers: Ortlieb Classic Back Rollers (2; 1,936g total).

Front basket: KLICKfix Mini (900g) + Permanent Basket Holder (100g). A little heavier than a traditional handlebar bag, but more versatile. The basket can hold a small backpack, snacks, a sweater or rocks to ward off wild dogs.

Rear rack: Tubus Logo (750g).

Kickstand: TBD.

PedalsMKS Sylvan Touring 9/16" Pedals + MKS Half Clip Mini Steel toe clips. Hefty and reliable.. The clips only stabilize the front of the foot, so it's easy to slide out safely during sudden stops. On more technical terrain, the clips can be easily removed altogether.

Front light: Cygolite Metro 400 USB (138g). 

Bottle cages: TBD.

Bungee cords: Pantel Tactical 36" (22g) + Pro Grip 24" Adjustable (25g).

Rear light: NiteRider Solas (71g).

Bicycle lock: Kryptonite Standard U-lock (1,1XXg).

Helmet: Giro Savant MIPS (XXg).

Cycling glovesGiro Tessa (39g).

Leg straps: Generic velcro straps (30g). 

Daypack: Patagonia Lightweight Black Hole Cinch Backpack 20L (463g) with a CamelBak Rain Cover (61g). The plan is to keep the Black Hole in my handlebar basket while riding. I'm also bringing the Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Daypack (65g) for days when I may want to wear the Black Hole and carry additional items in the Ultra-Sil in the basket. 

Spare brake pads: Avid BB7 pads (4 pairs; 90g total). To replace well-worn rim and disc brakes while on the road. We're riding with (and carrying) organic/steel pads, which have a little less stopping power and durability than the sintered version, but tend to be a bit quieter and offer better feathering abilities. For true mountain biking, sintered pads are probably better. Four pairs of pads are enough to swap out worn brakes twice (each pair is just for one wheel).

Security keys: Pinhead key and Hella key (47g total). To remove Pinhead locking wheel skewers and Hella security bolts (used to secure seatposts).

Rags: Packtowl Ultralite Soft Texture Towel strips (3g). For lubing chain.

Toothbrush: Liberty Mountain (12g). For cleaning chain and hard-to-reach bike parts.

Chain lube: Rock 'N Roll Gold, 4 ounces (107g). For keeping chains well-oiled. On the road, chain lube can be mixed up with a 3:1, mineral spirits:motor oil solution.

Pump: Pro Bike Tool Mini (127g). Mini-pump with integrated pressure gauge and attachments for both Presta and Schrader valves.

Multitool: Topeak Hexus II (161g) + Specialized EMT tire levers (38g). Includes all the hex wrenches and drivers one would need, plus a chain breaker and tire levers. Schwalbe tires can be a little too tough for the small levers, so a dedicated second pair helps.

Spoke repair kitFiber Fix (2; 30g total). For splinting a broken spoke in a pinch

Spare spokes: Pillar 285mm straight spokes (10; 60g total). For more lasting spoke repairs. Our bikes have a spot for two spokes each on the left rear chainstay. Extra spokes can be taped up and stuffed in the seatpost or tube until they're needed. The wheels we're riding use 285mm spokes for everything, but some bikes can take different lengths for the front wheel and rear wheel (driveside and non-driveside).

Spare cables: 5' shifter cable (22g) + 5' brake cable (XXg). A bicycle has two brake systems and two shifting systems, so there's already a backup onboard, but one spare length of each cable doesn't take up much room and can be helpful if something snaps.

Cassette remover: Stein Mini Cassette Lockring Driver (35g). Spare drive-side spokes aren't much use if one can't remove the cassette. This tiny tool does away with the need for some heavier ones (like a chain whip and adjustable wrench), taking up almost no room at the very bottom of a pannier. We haven't used this (ever), but hear good things.

Spare chain linksKMC Missing Link 9-speed (12; 24g total). Makes it easy to repair a broken chain, or just to snap the chain off for a thorough cleaning. We've ridden thousands of kilometers with a few of these links installed without any issues.

Patch kitPark Tool GP-2 Super (6; 24g total) + Rema Tip Top (18g). So light, compact, and useful that it makes sense to carry a whole bunch (each Park Tool set comes with six patches), in case other travelers are in need or we get really, really unlucky. The Park Tool patches are the peel-and-stick variety and the Rema kit comes with a tube of adhesive.

Superglue: Gorilla Glue Gel (28g). Helpful if patch adhesive wears out, for tire trouble, or a hole host of other things.

Inner tubes700c x 50mm Presta (3; 714g total). Cycling the world on 700c wheels is a dangerous game, so we'll be sure to use these sparingly—patching whenever possible—and stock up again whenever we can. Our Schwalbe Marathon Mondial tires promise great puncture protection (we never got one in thousands of kilometers cycling with Schwalbe Marathon Pluses), so pinch flats are our main worry. 

Spare nuts and boltsM4 bolts (6; XXg) + M5  bolts (4; XXg) + M4 nuts (4; XXg) + spacers (6; XXg). For when a few bolts get loose and inevitably get lost. All stainless steel. We'll be swapping out all our current bolts for stainless steel bolts secured with Loctite before hitting the road, so we should be able to avoid rusting or rattling bolts for quite a while.

TapeDuct tape (10'; 39g) + electrical tape (5'; 6g). Can be re-rolled around itself to take up less room and weight. Useful for ripped panniers, peeling handlebar tape, ad-hoc water bottle holders, or just about anything else.

Cable tiesLong ties (10; XXg). For securing a rack or broken bottle cage.

Shirts: Ibex Indie Hoody (248g) + Smartwool PhD Ultralight Quarter-Zip (178g) + Icebreaker Strike Lite Tank (102g). Merino wool regulates temperature amazingly well and can be worn for weeks straight (literally) with hardly any smell. In descending order of warmth: a half-zip sweater, a thin zip-up, and a tanktop.

Shoes: Vasque Grand Traverse (740g). They're not SPD-compatible, but plenty versatile for on and off the bike. Approach shoes are meant for scrambling up rough surfaces, and thus tend to be more durable than traditional hiking shoes.

Sandals: Rainbow Hemp Sandals (3XXg). For hanging around camp, fording rivers, or cycling on hot days. The Rainbows are pretty simple flip-flops, but well-made and plenty durable (still going strong after two years). When they wear out, Jay will probably replace them with a pair of Xero Shoes Z-Trails, which are a little more functional for hiking.

SocksWoolrich Superior Hiker Low-Cut Socks (40g) + Icebreaker Lifestyle Ultralight Low-Cut Socks (38g) + PureAthlete No-Show Wool Running Socks (32g) +.Icebreaker Snow Over-The-Calf Socks (87g). For hot, temperate, and cold temperatures. It's important to always have a dry pair of socks at night, so generally the warmest pair doesn't get any daytime use.

Underwear: Smartwool Merino 150 Pattern Boxer Briefs (2; 164g total). Only two sets of underwear may seem a bit austere for months and years of hard travel, but again: merino wool.

Pants (and shorts): The North Face Straight Paramount 3.0 Convertible Pants (468g). The least lame pair of zip-off pants Jay could find (which actually aren't too bad). Made of durable nylon with a DWR finish, they're good for on the bike, on the trail, in the city, or in a rain shower. The upper half work just fine as a pair of shorts or swimming trunks.

Multifunctional scarf: Merino wool reversible Buff (47g). Can be worn as a neck gaiter, bandana, headband, face mask, sleep mask, balaclava, hood, hairband, wristband, sweatband—even a sling in a pinch. Provides a bit of warmth and wind protection, but can also be soaked in cool water and worn around the neck when it's hot out. Provides a touch of style when looking otherwise slovenly after days in the wilderness, too.

Hat: Brooks Sherpa Hat (47g). Just a basic, quick-drying cap.

SunglassesSuncloud Causeway (31g) + EZESO Aluminum Glasses Shell (53g). Polarized. For protecting eyes on long stretches of bright, reflective road.

Jacket: Patagonia Nano Air Hoody (364g) + Patagonia Nano Puff (387g). May not cut it in Arctic temperatures, but both provide great warmth-for-weight, pack down small, and fit in nicely between a mid-layer and a wind/rain shell or layered together. The Nano Air is super-breathable and has a helmet-compatible hood, so it's much more pleasant to bike in.

Warm/cycling pants: Ibex Woolies 3 Bottom (227g). Merino wool and super-cozy.

Beanie: Buff Merino Wool Thermal Beanie (53g). Warm enough for well below 0C, and can be worn under the Nano Air hood for even more insulation.

Waterproof socks: DexShell Hytherm Pro (122g). Super-useful for warmth, wind-resistance, trudging through puddles, or hiking and biking in the rain. The merino wool lining inside keeps odors at bay (because, of course, these aren't breathable), while the waterproof outside really does keep feet dry. Works fine even when shoes are soaked.

Overshoes: Showers Pass Club (123g). A tad redundant given the waterproof socks, but these slide on over the shoe and keep things a little warmer and drier. While the waterproof socks are fine to wear off-bike, the overshoes can't really be walked in for too long without tearing them up.

Rain pants: Marmot Minimalist Pant (257g). Easy to slip on over a shoe or boot, and the zippered pocket is nice. Provides decent wind coverage. They're Gore-Tex, and so supposedly breathable (but only marginally more than other rain pants).

Rain shell: Marmot Minimalist Jacket (4XXg). Durable Gore-Tex, with a few pockets and a hood.

Waterproof glovesOutdoor Research Versaliner (75g). Clever pair of gloves that's actually two pairs of gloves: a thin waterproof/windproof layer that can be worn on its own, a warmer non-waterproof layer that can be worn on its own (with the waterproof liners zipped into a hideaway pouch), or the two worn together for particularly wet, cold, windy weather.

Shirts: Smartwool NTS Micro 150 T-Shirt (102g) + Ibex OD Heather T (110g) + Ibex Woolies 1 Zip T-Neck (154g) + Icebreaker Zone Long Sleeve Half Zip (222g) + Smartwool NTS Mid 250 Zip T (227g). Merino wool regulates temperature well and can be worn for long stretches of time with hardly any smell. The short-sleeved shirts will be for warmer weather. The lightweight, Iong-sleeved Woolies 1 will come in handy for UV protection (another great property of merino wool!) on hot, sunny days or as a good base layer on cooler days. The warmer Zone Long Sleeve Half Zip and NTS Mid 250 are great for activity in colder weather. 

Shoes: Scarpa Crux Approach Shoes (646g). They're not SPD-compatible, but versatile for on and off the bike. Approach shoes are durable, meant for scrambling up rough surfaces.

Sandals: Keen Whisper Sandals (444g). 

SocksDarn Tough Hiker Micro Crew Socks (2; 132g total) + Smartwool PhD Cycle Light Mini Socks (50g) +.Carhartt Extremes Cold Weather Boot Socks (130g).

Underwear: Patagonia Active Hipster Briefs (4; 132g total).

Bras: Smartwool PhD Seamless Racerback Bra (104g) + Smartwool PhD Seamless Double Strappy Bra (89g). Comfortable and merino wool!

Bathing Suit: Bathing suit (223g) and Patagonia Stretch Planing Micro Board Shorts (99g).

Shorts: Smartwool PhD Run shorts (2; 204g total). These shorts have an inner merino wool liner. 

Skirt: Toad&Co Chaka Skirt (157g). When biking around Iceland, Lauren met a fellow female cyclist who shared that she always brings a skirt on bike tours because of their versatility (great for walking around town, concealing a wardrobe change and more). The Chaka is loose-fitting and falls just above the knee. 

Pants: Smartwool NTS Micro 150 Bottom (125g) + Icebreaker Zone Leggings (163g) + prAna Halle Pant (short) (XXg). The NTS Micro 150 and Zone Leggings serve as a great merino wool base layer under the PhD Run shorts when it's getting a little cooler or under the Halle pants for colder weather. The NTS Micro 150 are more lightweight than the Zone. The Halle have a great stretch to them. 

Multifunctional scarf: Merino wool Buff (47g) + Original Buff (XXg). Can be worn as a neck gaiter, bandana, headband, face mask, sleep mask, balaclava, hood, hairband, wristband, sweatband and even serve as a sling in a pinch. Provides wind and sun protection. Can be soaked in cold water and worn around the neck for cooling when it's hot out. The merino wool version is great for added warmth. Available in different colors, patterns and styles!

Hat: Columbia Bora Bora Booney II Hat (79g). Just a basic, wide brimmed hat offering sun protection.

SunglassesWarby Parker Laurel Sunglasses (XXg) + EZESO Aluminum Glasses Shell (53g) . These are prescription lenses for protecting eyes on long stretches of bright, reflective road (and a backup for Lauren's everyday glasses). 

Jacket: Patagonia Nano Air Hoody (XXg) + Patagonia Nano Puff (XXg). May not cut it in Arctic temperatures, but both provide great warmth-for-weight, pack down small, and fit in nicely between a mid-layer and a wind/rain shell or layered together. The Nano Air is super-breathable and has a helmet-compatible hood, so it's much more pleasant to bike in.

Beanie: Fleece Headband (31g) + Smartwool NTS Micro 150 Beanie (16g) + Icebreaker Skyline Hat (XXg).

Waterproof socks: DexShell Hytherm Pro (107g). Super-useful for warmth, wind-resistance, trudging through puddles, or hiking and biking in the rain. The merino wool lining inside keeps odors at bay, while the waterproof outside keeps feet dry. 

Overshoes: Showers Pass Club (114g). A tad redundant given the waterproof socks, but these slide on over the shoe and keep things a little warmer and drier. While the waterproof socks are fine to wear off-bike, the overshoes can't really be walked in for too long without tearing them up.

Rain pants: Columbia Sportswear Storm Surge Pant (269g). 

Rain shell: Marmot Precip (269g). Lighweight, keeps the torso dry, and stows into its own pocket. Features a hideaway and adjustable hood that can be worn over or under a helmet. Comes in a billion colors.

Waterproof gloves: Outdoor Research Versaliner (59g). Clever pair of gloves that's actually two pairs of gloves: a thin waterproof/windproof layer that can be worn on its own, a warmer non-waterproof layer that can be worn on its own (with the waterproof liners zipped into a hideaway pouch), or the two worn together for particularly wet, cold, windy weather.

Camera: Sony RX100MIII (315g) + OP/TECH strap (XXg) + SUNPAK mini-tripod (68g) + extra Sony NP-BX1 batteries (2; 46g total) + SanDisk MicroSDXC cards (3, totaling 256GB of storage; 3g total) + Vastar Cell Phone Tripod Mount (25g). Super-compact yet highly functional. Shoots about as well as Jay's fancy DSLR (with less range, of course), and has a pop-up electronic viewfinder that's really fun to use. The tiny strap and tiny tripod make it just about the smallest film studio one could travel with. The Vastar mount is for shooting time-lapses with a cell phone. [10 REASONS TO LEAVE THE DSLR AT HOME WHEN BIKE TOURING]

E-reader: Kindle Paperwhite, with Ayuto case (297g). Carries thousands and thousands of books at less the weight of a single paperback. Holds a charge for weeks and offers an adjustable backlight for nighttime reading. A must-have for those rainy afternoons and long nights and off-days. [GEAR REVIEW]

Headlamp: Black Diamond Revolt (99g), with extra Black Diamond AAA Rechargeable Batteries (36g). It's slim-pickings for an affordable USB-rechargeable headlamp with a red light function (useful for seeing around without blinding fellow travelers and yourself) and decent battery life, so this seems the best option by far. A particularly nice feature is that the USB-rechargeable batteries can be swapped out for standard AAA batteries (or another pair of rechargeable ones), in case a little more juice is needed before the next charging stop.

PhoneNexus 5X, with ImpactStrong case (180g). Map, camera, blogging platform, podcast player, music machine, and sometimes-unnecessary portal to the outside world. Jay's phone runs on Google's Project Fi [GEAR REVIEW], which means unlimited texting, dirt-cheap calls, and data that's the same price anywhere in the world.

Earbuds: Amazon Premium Headphones (14g). For podcasts and music while cycling. In-line volume and play/pause/skip features are nice for easy adjustments, and it's a good idea to bring earbuds without those little rubbery pieces that can (and will) fall off.

Bluetooth keyboard: Moko Foldable Bluetooth Keyboard (287g). Great for blogging and keeping this site up-to-date. It's a full-size keyboard that pairs to a phone, holds a charge a respectably long time, offers a backlight, and is comfortable to write at length with.

USB battery bank: Anker Astro E7 26,800mAh (483g). There's nothing worse than always looking for an outlet or wasting away days in a cafe just to charge some devices. Power banks can hold a ton of juice and can charge nearly every electronic we're carrying—bike lights, phones, camera, e-readers—while pedaling down the road.

Travel adapter, USB brick, and cords: USB-C cord (13g) + USB-B cord (19g) + Flexzion Power Plug Adapter (83g) + Generic brick (25g). To charge up the battery banks once every week or two. The USB-C cord is needed for Jay's phone.

E-reader: Kindle Paperwhite, with Fintie Case (333g). Carries thousands and thousands of books at less the weight of a single paperback. Holds a charge for weeks and offers an adjustable backlight for nighttime reading. A must-have for those rainy afternoons and long nights and off-days. 

Headlamp: Black Diamond Revolt (97g). It's slim-pickings for an affordable USB-rechargeable headlamp with a red light function (useful for seeing around without blinding fellow travelers and yourself) and decent battery life, so this seems the best option by far. A particularly nice feature is that the USB-rechargeable batteries can be swapped out for standard AAA batteries, in case a little more juice is needed before the next charging stop.

Phone: Samsung Galaxy S6 with OtterBox Defender Series case (210g).

Earbuds: TBD.

USB battery bank: EC Technology 22,400mAh (470g). Power banks can hold a ton of juice and can charge nearly every electronic we're carrying—bike lights, phones, camera, e-readers—while pedaling down the road.

Travel adapter, USB brick, and cords: TBD.

Spork: Sickle Titanium (14g). A fork and spoon in one. Jay's includes a bottle opener at the end for the occasional beer.

Knife: Kershaw Knockout folding knife (109g). Small(ish), sharp, safe, effective. Fine for cutting vegetables, rope, or strips of tape.

Bowl: Sea-to-Summit XL Bowl (121g). Large enough for a hearty meal, yet folds down flat in the pannier.

Bottles: Generic gallon bottles (2; 1XXg total) + generic 1L soda bottle (XXg) + 1L Ultralite Nalgene (99g) Don't believe the hype: reusing plastic bottles aren't actually bad for you. It won't hurt to swap them out once every month or two if they've been in the sun a lot, but when a replacement is needed it's super-easy to find. Their weight and cost are both entirely negligible, and their rigidity allows them to sit empty right in a bottle cage, unlike collapsible bottles that tend to fall out when they have nothing left in them. The Nalgene can handle hot beverages (like tea) and its wide mouth allows for cleaning out stickier drinks.

Spork: Snow Peak Titanium Spork (14g). A fork and spoon in one!

Knife: Kershaw Leek folding knife (69g). Small, sharp, safe, effective. Fine for cutting vegetables, rope, or strips of tape.

Bowl: TBD.

Bottles: TBD.

Cookset: Snow Peak 1.4L titanium pot and titanium pan/pot lid (125g + 63g). The large pot is enough to cook food for two, while the pan can either be used to make a (tiny) stir-fry or to act as a lid for the pot.

Stove: MSR Dragonfly, with QuietStove damper cap (548g). After a thorough bit of research on the best multifuel stove, the MSR Dragonfly won out on its decades-strong reputation and simmering ability. It's loud, but the after-market QuietStove cap brings it to a reasonable volume.

Fuel bottle: MSR fuel bottle, 30oz (219g). Though smaller and lighter locking bottles exist, this one can hold a whole lot of fuel. Not running out of gas mid-meal in the middle of the wilderness—or having to search for white gas once per week—seems worth the extra grams and size.

Fuel: Variable (100g to 887g). A multifuel stove can accept a lot of different types of fuel. We'll try to carry white gas whenever we can find it and gasoline when we can't.

Water filter: Platypus GravityWorks 4L Filter System (322g). One of the items we're most excited to try out, this gravity filter makes questionable water potable without labor- and time-intensive pumping, ultraviolet radiation, or chemical treatment. You simply fill the 4L bladder with dirty water, raise it above the container you're filling (it comes with a second 4L bladder, or can filter directly into bottles), and within a few minutes gravity pulls the water through the filter, cleaning it in the process. Freezing temperatures can break the filter, so keeping it dry and/or cuddling up with it on really cold nights—and bringing backup iodine tablets (which we're doing)—are all good ideas. Can also be capped, strapped to a rear rack, and transported, for an extra two gallons (one in the dirty bladder and one in the clean bladder) of water storage on remote stretches.

SoapCampsuds (119g). Biodegradable and non-toxic, it doubles as a toiletry and can be used to wash whatever: pots, pans, clothes, hair, skin, or bikes.

Cutting board: Cut sides of an old water jug (3; XXg total). Super-thin, free, and easily replaceable.

Firestarter: UST Spark Force Firestarter (27g) + generic lighter (12g). Two pieces of metal is the surest way to get a spark in any situation, but a lighter is nice for convenience. We'll bring both.

Dish rag: Packtowl Ultralite Soft Texture Towel, strip (4g). Packed sponges get really gross really quickly. A strip of a quick-drying towel can be repeatedly wrung out, and is less likely to fall apart in a few weeks.

Storage bags: Ziploc Double Zipper (6 quart, 8 gallon 105g total) + rubber bands (5; 3g total). For repackaging groceries, storing leftovers, hydrating dried food, and more. The slider variety worked terrible in the past; these seem to be the least likely to leak. Of course, plastic bags are not single-use, so they can last a while if carefully handled.

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Of course, the food and water itself is highly variable from day-to-day. Items will naturally be replaced and added to over the course of a trip, but this are how we're starting out.

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WaterH20 (1,000g per liter). We're each aiming to drink about 4L per day (with another 1L for emergencies), plus have water for cooking and washing up. Depending on where we're biking then, we may carry as little as 3L each and as much as 20L or 30L.

GroceriesPeanut butter, bread, rice, potatoes, onions, produce, nuts, tea bags, sugar, coconut oil, berbere spice, etc. Again, distance (and budget) dictates how much food one should carry. Coconut oil and berbere spice are our main seasonings for cooking (coconut oil has a ton of other uses, too).

Sleeping bagKatabatic Alsek 22F 850fp6' (680g). Super-minimalist bags that use some clever engineering (basically missing the back side) to save on space and weight. Rated for 22F/-6C and have kept us plenty warm to date.

Sleeping padTherm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm, R (496g). Easily inflatable and comfortable. Provides decent insulation from the cold ground.

Pillow: Exped Ultralight Medium Air Pillow (50g). Sleeping on a lump of clothes is okay for a shorter trip, but when it's cold and those clothes are all being worn (or when they're just really, really dirty), a pillow is nice. This one inflates in just a breath and a half, weighs virtually nothing, and takes up less room than a stick of deodorant.

Sleeping bagKatabatic Alsek 22F 850fp, <6' (649g).

Sleeping padTherm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm, S (436g). 

Pillow: TBD (XXg)

TentBig Agnes Copper Spur HV UL4 (2,526g) + spare stakes (2; 22g total) + Sea-to-Summit Ultra-Sil Compression 14L/Medium Dry Sack (91g). Two vestibules provide shelter for the bikes, and two tent openings make getting out of the tent in the middle of the night much easier. As a four-person tent, it's absolutely palatial compared to the two-person Copper Spur we were intending to bring, but that extra room will be much appreciated during rainy days stuck inside. Squeezed into a compression sack, it still packs down fairly small. Big Agnes has absolutely amazing customer service, and we've used their tents extensively in the past.

Groundcloth: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL4 Footprint (325g). Pricey on its own, but came with the deal we found on the tent.

Sleeping pad pumpTherm-a-Rest AirTap Pump Kit (48g). Our sleeping pads take between ten and twenty deep breaths to inflate, but the AirTap kit makes things a bit easier after long days at high altitudes. It's a simple, tiny valve that can be attached to any bag. When the bag is closed and then compressed, the air is forced into the sleeping pad. When not being used as a pump, the bag can store sleeping pads, sleeping bags, or both.

Toothbrush: GUM Travel Folding Toothbrush (19g). Folds into itself for easy storage.

ToothpasteTom's 5.5oz Flouride-Free (156g). 

Hand sanitizerPurell 1oz (70g). 

SunscreenAlba Botanica Hawaiian Suncreen (87g). 

Moisturizer: Amara Organics (87g). 

DeodorantBan Unscented Roll-On (97g).

Squeeze tubes: Silicone squeeze tubes, 3.3oz (3; 141g total). For holding soap, lotion, and sunblock.

Towel and washragPacktowl Ultralite Soft Texture Towel (35g). Highly absorbent and wrings out tons of water. A small strip of a larger towel can be cut to act as a washrag. Hyper-absorbent towels don't need to cover a full body to actually dry a full body.

Hair/beard trimmer: AVANTEK Hair Clippers (248g). For keeping hair short and manageable. One of (very few) cordless and USB-rechargeable options.

Tweezers/nail clippersSatin Edge Needle-Nose Tweezers (Xg) + nail clippers (XXg).

Toilet paper: Tissue-on-the-Go coreless roll (2; 130g total). We'll have to replace these with normal rolls once they're through, but the coreless rolls save a lot of space in panniers (or just a bit of time in re-rolling a regular roll).

TrowelTentlab Deuce of Spades Trowel (16g). To properly dispose of waste when in nature.

(Soap is already mentioned in the foodware section, so it's not listed again here.)

Toothbrush: GUM Travel Folding Toothbrush (19g). Folds into itself for easy storage.

ToothpasteTom's 5.5oz Flouride-Free (156g). 

Hand sanitizer: TBD

Sunblock: TBD

Moisturizer: TBD

Deodorant: TBD.

Squeeze tubes: Silicone squeeze tubes, 3.3oz (3; 141g total). For holding soap, lotion, and sunblock.

Towel and washrag: TBD.

Hair/beard trimmer: TBD.

Tweezers/nail clippersTravel tweezers and nail clippers (XXg).

Toilet paper: Tissue-on-the-Go coreless roll (2; 130g total). We'll have to replace these with normal rolls once they're through, but the coreless rolls save a lot of space in panniers (or just a bit of time in re-rolling a regular roll).

TrowelTentlab Deuce of Spades Trowel (16g). To properly dispose of waste when in nature.

(Soap is already mentioned in the foodware section, so it's not listed again here.)

Mosquito headnetSea-to-Summit cinching headnet (34g). For preventing malaria, dengue fever, zika, and other mosquito-borne illnesses by looking so ridiculous that mosquitoes will stay away (that's how these work, right?). 

WhistleREI whistle (20g). For signaling when lost (or for calling attention to a situation). Whistles can also be useful for noting your presence before winding around blind mountain corners.

First aid guide: NOLS Wilderness Medicine, 5th Edition (Kindle Version) (0g). The textbook that teaches Wilderness First Responders how to become Wilderness First Responders. Obviously, this should be read in full before something goes wrong. We each have the e-book version on our Kindles and phones for offline access, and the chapters are well-organized for quick consultation. If time and budget allows, a proper NOLS course is really valuable. 

Mosquito headnetSea-to-Summit cinching headnet (34g).

Whistle and compassSilva Specialty compass-thermometer-whistle (1XXg).

First aid guide: NOLS Wilderness Medicine, 5th Edition (Kindle Version) (0g). The textbook that teaches Wilderness First Responders how to become Wilderness First Responders. Obviously, this should be read in full before something goes wrong. We each have the e-book version on our Kindles and phones for offline access, and the chapters are well-organized for quick consultation. If time and budget allows, a proper NOLS course is really valuable. 

Insect repellent: Repel DEET 40% (201g). DEET is obviously not great for anyone, but pretty necessary in the areas we'll be traveling. Note that DEET will melt plastics (including synthetic clothing) and thus should be handled carefully.

Bandages: Band-Aid assorted set (19g) + 3M Steri-Strips (15g). Band-Aid's greatest hits, including the big patches for knee scrapes and the little ones for paper cuts.The strips are for closing skin on deeper cuts.

Wrap tape: Prairie Horse Supply, 2" x 15' (18g). Coming in so many fun colors—our roll is a blindingly hot pink—it'd almost be a disappointment not to need it at some point. Self-adhering for wrapping arms, wrists, legs, etc. with an antibiotic cream.

Antibiotic cream: GoodSense Maximum Strength Triple Antibiotic Ointment, 1oz (33g). For preventing infections around scrape and cuts.

Hydrocortisone: Cortizone 10 cream, 2oz (67g). For itchy or painful insect stings or bites.

Surgical gloves. Latex-free pair (2; ≈10g total). For administering first-aid without inadvertently dirtying up the wound site or coming in contact with bodily fluids.

Cotton swabs: Q-tips (20; ≈10g total). Likewise, for cleaning a wound and applying an antibiotic cream.

Water purification pillsPotable Aqua Iodine tablets (31g). We're gravity-filtering all of our non-potable water, but these are essential to have as a backup (in case the filter breaks, or for water that may have viruses, which can't be filtered out).

Oral rehydration salts: RecoverORS (10; ≈ 55g total). For staying hydrated while an intestinal infection runs its course. If we need more on the road, these can whipped up with a 1tsp:8tsp salt:sugar ratio, mixed into a liter of water.

Ibuprofen: GoodSense Ibuprofen 200mg tablets, 100 doses (45g). For general inflammation, soreness, fever, headaches, and cycling-related pain. 

Motion sickness preventative: Bonine, 32 doses (10g). For motion sickness on the occasional ride by bus, ferry, boat, or train.

Antidiarrheal: Kirkland Signature Anti-Diarrheal, 100-count (33g). For the inevitable stomach bugs and bacteria that will plague our digestive systems as we eat and drink our way around the world.

Antibiotic: Ciprofloxacin (≈20g). A harsher yet more effective general-purpose antibiotic to kill off infections almost anywhere in the body. This—coupled with lots and lots of rehydration fluids—is what brought Jay back to life during a nasty bout of e. coli while in India.

Malaria treatment: Doxycycline/malarone (≈90g). A 90-day (preventative) supply of each, which is enough to treat malaria or other infections a number of times. We're not planning on actually using them as preventatives. [WHY WE'RE NOT BRINGING MALARIA PILLS ON OUR BIKE TRIP]

Passport/yellow card: US Passport (34g) + International Certificate of Immunization (8g). Strange vestiges of a feudal age, these little booklets grant us the privilege to enter most countries on the planet. We're setting off with brand new (non-standard) 52-page passports.The yellow card is required for entry into one country when coming from another with endemic yellow fever.

Money/license: Credit card (9g) + debit card (5g) US driver's license (5g). The driver's license is just in case we need to rent a car at any point. We'll, of course, be carrying cash, too, and mostly using that to pay for things.

Eyeglasses: Warby Parker Clarks (37g) + aluminum case (68g) + microfiber cloth (3g). The aluminum case is much lighter and more compact than standard eyeglass cases.

Stuff sacks: Basic stuff sacks (3; ≈ 40g total). Organized panniers are good; panniers that are too organized aren't. We leave our most well-worn clothing freely floating at the top of a rear pannier, but less-used stuff (like the first aid kit or bike gear) and small or messy items (like the cookset and stove) are much more manageable in dedicated stuff sacks.

Pen and notebook: Generic pen (Xg) + Traveler's Notebook Insert, Grid (83g). For jotting things down. A capped pen, versus the push-to-engage variety, is less likely to accidentally open and scrawl itself all over stuff.

Ear plugs: MyTravelUp Earplugs (4g). For noisy campsites or hostels.

Passport/yellow card: US Passport (34g) + International Certificate of Immunization (8g). We're setting off with brand new (non-standard) 52-page passports.The yellow card is required for entry into one country when coming from another with endemic yellow fever.

Money/license: Credit card (Xg) + debit card (Xg) US driver's license (Xg).

Eyeglasses: BCBG Max Azria Esmee Eyeglasses (XXg) + EZESO Aluminum Case (68g) + microfiber cloth (Xg). 

Stuff sacks: TBD.

Pen and notebookGeneric pen (Xg) + Traveler's Notebook Insert, Grid (83g). For jotting things down. A capped pen, versus the push-to-engage variety, is less likely to accidentally open and scrawl itself all over stuff.

Ear plugsMyTravelUp Earplugs (4g). For noisy campsites or hostels.

Sleeping Mask: Alaska Bear Natural Silk Sleep Mask (18g)To help keep the light out during daytime naps or late mornings!

Playing cards: Loftus Mini Playing Cards (39g). We play a lot of cards when traveling (Lost Cities is a two-player favorite), and these mini-cards weigh less than (and take up a quarter of the room of) a full deck. They look foolishly small, but they're actually easier to handle—going back to a full-size deck can be jarring.

Paracord: Paracord Planet Type III 7-Strand 550 Paracord, 50' (96g). For fixes and plenty of camping hacks: securing something to a bike, building an emergency shelter, tying together a raft, or making a canopy. Also useful to know a few knots: boline, figure-8, taut-line, slipknot, square knot.

Sewing supplies: Needle, thread, and dental floss (XXg total). For basic repairs on clothing or camping gear. Floss is tougher, and can help stitch together a torn pannier or blown tire sidewall. 

Papers: Magic Letter, contact information, image cards, extra passport photos, thank-you cards, maps, etc. (XXg). The Magic Letter is an old bike touring trick: just a short paragraph or two explaining where you're from, where you're headed, why you're traveling, and thanking the reader for helping your journey continue safely. It gets translated and rewritten in the local language by the first person you meet who speaks both your language and the local language. Contact information (email address, website) can be pre-printed on little strips of paper for folks on the road. A laminated card with images of tents and water spigots and crossed-out animal outlines can be useful for communicating that you're looking for a camping spot or pump or vegan meal when words or charades fail. Extra passport photos in a few different sizes can speed up getting visas en route, and thank-you cards are nice to give to those who provide some help along the way. Maps are maps, and can range from mildly helpful to a life-saving backup.